porticopresentations

M Dotter Dotter từ Muhammad Khan Katiar, Pakistan từ Muhammad Khan Katiar, Pakistan

Người đọc M Dotter Dotter từ Muhammad Khan Katiar, Pakistan

M Dotter Dotter từ Muhammad Khan Katiar, Pakistan

porticopresentations

Vẫn sẽ tốt như một loạt, mặc dù nó đã trở thành một công thức nhỏ. Nhưng làm thế nào nó có thể không? Mức độ căng thẳng đã giảm đi phần nào, cũng như có liên hệ với người thường. Trong cuốn sách này, ngoại trừ cảnh sát mới được giới thiệu, không có dân gian bình thường nào là nhân vật. Mavis kéo ra một nhân vật là một hoot và cao độ hoàn hảo. Thích thú nhưng không nhất thiết phải đáng đọc lại. Tôi có # 1-10 và thỉnh thoảng đọc lại chúng nhưng một vài trong số những cuốn sau này đạt đến cấp độ đó.

porticopresentations

Are you frustrated with the agrarian nostalgia implicit in the food movement? Are you worried as much about farm workers as you are about farmers? Does the organic movement strike you as elitist? Do you care about food deserts and wonder about the ways eating sustainability as become a marker of socio-economic status? Robert Gottlieb and Anupama Joshi have written the book for you. What is food justice? “The interpretations of food justice can be complex and nuanced, but the concept is simple and direct: justice for all in the food system, whether producers, farmworkers, processors, workers, eaters, or communities. Integral to food justice is also a respect for the systems that support how and where the food is grown – an ethic of place regarding the land, the air, the water, the plants, the animals, and the environment. The groups that embrace food justice vary in agendas, constituencies, and focus, but all share a commitment to the definition we originally provided: to achieve equity and fairness in relation to food system impacts and a different, more just, and sustainable way for food to be grown, produced, made accessible, and eaten” (223). The first half of the book offers a food justice framework for the problems facing our food supply. The first chapter looks at growing and producing food, the second at accessing food, and the third at consuming food. The forth chapter examples food politics from the farm bill to the school lunch counter while the fifth chapter considers the impact of neoliberal globalization. The second half of the book examines the struggles to achieve food justice. It looks at the solutions communities have already begun. What I particularly value about this section of the book is the way it integrates a food justice perspective into already existing threads of the food movement – rather than throwing out core concepts like slow food and local food. I also appreciated their attention to questions of gender in discussing an example of the complex relationship between women and food at domestic violence shelters. The chapters in the second half look at farms (including community gardens, immigrant farmers, urban farmers), new food routes (including farmers markets and CSAs), slow food & local food, local & national food initiatives, and a discussion of vision and direction for the “emerging movement.”

porticopresentations

I think I need a sabaticcal from ordinary joe/joanne memoirs. It all starts out OK, I'm enjoying myself, and then the person just starts to annoy me! As a woman who was diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age myself (41), I realy thought I would relate to her staory, and early on, I did. Her process and recovery would be of interest to me, but not so much the story of her life and her almost squeamishly strong attachment to her father. Sorry, but I'm just not interested in her jobs or how she met her husband. There's not enough here for someone who doesn't know her already to really be interested in and to learn from, let alone be inspired by. By the end, I was just racing through it. My advice, skip it.