lalibertee9817

G từ Rahimanagar, West Bengal, Ấn Độ từ Rahimanagar, West Bengal, Ấn Độ

Người đọc G từ Rahimanagar, West Bengal, Ấn Độ

G từ Rahimanagar, West Bengal, Ấn Độ

lalibertee9817

It seems I've developed a certain crankiness when it comes to traditional fantasy novels. I'm a fan of the genre, but even some of the best books come off as cliched and narrow-minded if you think too hard about them. And yet here we have a book that seemingly dabbles in all the tired cliches but is a joy to read from end to end. As far as world-building goes, TNotW is no great shakes. Starting from the map on the inside cover that looks vaguely like Europe, Rothfuss supplies a lot of bog-standard fantasy tropes: magic? dragons? heroism? check check check. The book is a coming of age story involving a school for young magicians, which has been a winning formula for other authors too I think. But none of this really matters. In fact, the book would still be almost as good if it didn't have magic elements at all. The real stars here are Rothfuss's fluid writing style and strong characters. Kvothe is as fascinating a hero as I've seen in a fantasy novel in a long time. He's brilliant, arrogant, a bit of a drama queen, but also pretty likeable. He struggles with grief and poverty and disappointment as much as with "dark arts best left alone." He has a sense of humor and Rothfuss writes him some scathingly sarcastic banter. He seems like a real person, and someone you'd actually want to spend 700 pages with. Compare him in your mind with Robert Jordan's one-note characters like Rand al'Thor, and you'll realize that Patrick Rothfuss knows how to write. It only gets four stars because the ending is totally unsatisfying and I'm expecting great things from the next two books in the series. Get cracking, Rothfuss.