elenaselivanova

Elena Selivanova Selivanova từ Haddington, Đông Lothian EH41 4LW, Vương Quốc Anh từ Haddington, Đông Lothian EH41 4LW, Vương Quốc Anh

Người đọc Elena Selivanova Selivanova từ Haddington, Đông Lothian EH41 4LW, Vương Quốc Anh

Elena Selivanova Selivanova từ Haddington, Đông Lothian EH41 4LW, Vương Quốc Anh

elenaselivanova

Được rồi, tôi đã cố gắng nghe nó tại nơi làm việc và phát lại một số đĩa CD nhiều lần. Đây có thể là một tác giả mà tôi cũng cần dành nhiều sự chú ý hơn. Tôi sẽ lắng nghe người tiếp theo trong một chuyến đi đường.

elenaselivanova

An okay book about a mouse who finds a home of humans! How obsurd! Read to find out!

elenaselivanova

I like the premise of this book - that artists have managed to intuit things about human nature that neuroscience is only now discovering to be true - and have heard it from several other sources. But that's about all I really liked about the book - it follows a pretty basic format in each chapter of 1) Introduce the artist's work; 2)Introduce the brain science idea this relates to; 3) Kind of discuss the two in a pretty disjointed way. Also, I would think that Lehrer didn't really mean to say that Escoffier "discovered" our fifth taste, or that Proust "knew" about the unreliability of our memory - he often seems to give the impression that a lot of these artists were almost prophetic in their work, when really I think it came down to experience - Escoffier cooked the way he did because it tasted good, and Proust likely wrote about memory as an unreliable source because he found it to be through his own experience. I feel like in almost any Intro Cognitive/Neuro/Other Brain Science class, the professor will undoubtedly mention that a large number of modern experiments in brain science are really just empirically proving what we already probably guessed about human nature to being with - so in this sense, we're seemingly all "neuroscientists". This book would probably also be better for people who didn't study brain stuff in college... The things I enjoyed and got most out of the book was actually mostly about the artists and their art themselves. The only chapters that I really enjoyed were 3 - Escoffier and Taste, and 7 - Stravinsky and Music (both of these were actually quite good). I also liked 4 - Proust and Memory and 5 - Cezanne and Sight, though I liked these more for what Lehrer said about the artists and their work than for their correlation with modern brain science. Finally, Lehrer's writing style just started to drive me nuts - he manages to wax poetic or summarize complex ideas in a seemingly intentionally hip and concise way about just about... anything, just about... all the time. Stuff like "Color became symbolic. Blurriness was chic. The gaze was out, the glance was in." This might sound alright in isolation, but with nearly every paragraph ending this way, it becomes nearly vomit-inducing. Maybe just me.