megainaya

Mega Inaya Inaya từ Nadezhka 150000, Kazakhstan từ Nadezhka 150000, Kazakhstan

Người đọc Mega Inaya Inaya từ Nadezhka 150000, Kazakhstan

Mega Inaya Inaya từ Nadezhka 150000, Kazakhstan

megainaya

"Tannis, có ai không?" Điều gì đã được giải trí về cuốn sách này? So sánh nó với bộ phim và đọc tác phẩm L. A. Times của Ray Bradbury tranh luận về một kết thúc khác.

megainaya

Tuyệt vời và đọc nhanh. Một cuộc hành trình tuổi trẻ đầy biến động của một cô gái khi cô ấy uống theo cách của mình qua tuổi thiếu niên và tuổi đôi mươi.

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Diễn ra ở Pháp, kiểm tra các mối quan hệ hoặc thiếu nó, yếu tố hồi hộp giữ cho nó không chỉ là hai ngôi sao.

megainaya

Incredibly good overview of the three major world religions. This is one of the books I will always count on to help answer my questions regarding the background of Islam, Judaism and Christianity. Armstrong tackles these huge subjects without being overly academic or biased.

megainaya

Absolutely incredible. Sadly a week has passed since I finished this. So, my memory is already a little fuzzy. But here's what I remember: brilliant book... but brilliant, not in the clever sense... or even the "timeless" sense. Lionel Shriver immerses me in a world better than anyone else I can think of. It doesn't matter to me what the subject is; I want to read what she writes because with exquisite detail and interest, she delves deeply into the psyche and lives of her protagonists. This book is the fictitious memoir of the mother of a school shooter (killed ~11 people). She is writing to her estranged husband 2 years after the incident, and she goes through their lives together from before their child was born until the fateful/fatal day. As a mother, I was fascinated by her account of motherhood -- especially her "unspeakable" crime of not bonding with her child, who IMO was a psychopath from birth. A friend of mine researched psychopathic children, and I hope she reads this book because I'd love to hear her take on how well it jives with what she has learned. The ending was good. Let's just say that. I read the "P.S." notes & more at the end of the book, and gosh I can't believe that she had a hard time getting this book published. It's ridiculous because it's so clearly brilliant writing, but the gist is that her publishers were hesitant to publish something on this subject because they didn't think it would be appealing. Aren't there plenty of people who are willing to read something, even on a grim subject, when it's so well done?