giorgiacassino

Gi từ 27052 Sanguignano PV, Ý từ 27052 Sanguignano PV, Ý

Người đọc Gi từ 27052 Sanguignano PV, Ý

Gi từ 27052 Sanguignano PV, Ý

giorgiacassino

Tôi bị cuốn hút vào loạt bài này. Đầu tiên tôi nghĩ đó sẽ là "người đàn ông cuối cùng trên trái đất ... điển hình được bao quanh bởi những người phụ nữ mạnh mẽ, tất cả đều muốn có một mảnh của anh ta", nhưng tôi thấy mình thực sự bị cuốn hút bởi cốt truyện. Một loại virus giết chết tất cả các loài đực của trái đất, trừ một người và khỉ cưng của anh ta. Âm thanh ngớ ngẩn tôi biết. Nhưng khi người ta nghĩ rằng phần lớn phi công hàng không, tài xế xe tải, chính phủ, quân đội, bác sĩ, v.v ... là đàn ông..tôi, nó tạo ra một động lực thú vị khi tất cả họ đột ngột chết. Dù sao, một niềm vui đọc.

giorgiacassino

This is the least satisfying of the first baker's dozen of Spenser mysteries (which are superior to the next baker's dozen, which in turn are superior to the next and last). But, since Parker is a master technician, there is still enough sharp wit, deft description, and mayhem—with a little sex and moralizing thrown in for good measure—to make your reading experience worthwhile. Spenser is hired by the extraordinarily wealthy Hugh Dixon as an instrument of revenge. Dixon is now a paraplegic, a victim of a London explosion that killed his wife and two daughters. But, although gravely injured, he got a good look at the nine right-wing terrorists responsible, and gives Spenser forensic artist sketches to help him in his search. Dixon's offer: a generous expense account, which will be necessary to pursue this international terrorist cell, and $2500 dollars for each individual terrorist, dead or alive. Perhaps one of the reasons I don't like this novel as much as other Spensers is that our hero isn't exactly the bounty hunter type, and all that heartless killing tires him out--and me--quite a bit. But of course at also gives him an excuse to call up Hawk, who is better suited to such heartlessness. Seeing them work together for the first time is both interesting and instructive. But much of the book seems little more than an excuse to write off a cool two week vacation as a novelist's business expense, as Hawk and Spenser jet from London, to Copenhagen, to Amsterdam, and then to Montreal for the Olympics. There's a lot of that incisive Spenser description, but all the changing scenery—and the many killings—become tedious after awhile.