mklepaczewski

Maciej Klepaczewski Klepaczewski từ Flushing, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11, Vương Quốc Anh từ Flushing, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11, Vương Quốc Anh

Người đọc Maciej Klepaczewski Klepaczewski từ Flushing, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11, Vương Quốc Anh

Maciej Klepaczewski Klepaczewski từ Flushing, Falmouth, Cornwall TR11, Vương Quốc Anh

mklepaczewski

Một đoạn ngắn, nhanh chóng, thú vị về một cô gái trẻ, mới mồ côi đi về phía tây trên một chiếc xe ngựa. Người chú độc ác của cô đang nóng trên con đường của cô, cũng như Dịch vụ bắt trẻ em Catchum. Tôi thích sự thay đổi trong phông chữ để tạo ra sự căng thẳng ở cuối mỗi chương, và tôi thích kết thúc có hậu. Vui vẻ miền tây hoang dã tốt nhất cho Lớp 3 - 5.

mklepaczewski

The story of the celebration dinner for the small bullfighter was amazing.

mklepaczewski

My thinking on choosing to read this: "Watership Down, about DOGS?!?" Could life be more perfect? Ooof, was I ever off-base. Granted, there's no mistaking. These are both unquestionably by the same author. Pastoral scenes are vivid, the animals' modes of thinking are vivid, the scale is epic... and yes, Watership Down has head-scratchy moments where the animal's perspective makes something familiar to humans alien, scenes of terror that get practically drug-trippy, parts that wring your heart because terrible horrible things happen to innocent animals... and Plague Dogs has all of those too. BUT. The dark and scary is all the darker and scarier. The sunniness of the lapine outlook, against all expectation, is not copied in the canine outlook. (If there's any animal happier than a dog--well, any land animal, dolphins have an unfair advantage, being as they're already grinning--I defy you to show me a rival to a happy dog... I do think Adams emphasized the servility a lot to convey how abused the dogs were, but he ought to have acknowledged the natural buoyancy of dogs.) The rabbits, Adams tells us, shake off each night of terrors like a dream when the next day dawns and summer warms everyone up again. The two plague dogs are only worn at more and more. I think part of it is the actual damage done to the animals. Snitter, the Fiver of this book, is intelligent but tortured. And he's not grounded as well by Rowf, his companion, the way Fiver is by Hazel, because Rowf too has been tortured. Moreover, man is more explicitly the enemy here, and unlike dispassionate crows, badgers, dogs, cats, etc, of Watership Down, the inhumanity of men in in Plague Dogs is personal, and inventive. The ending is torturous to the animal lovers who read it (namely myself,) but I have to say, it fits perfectly. And I'm willing to take the half-comfort it offers because those poor plague dogs? They deserve a rest.

mklepaczewski

There was only one boy that Julie Spencer had a crush on in high school Ty Calhoun, and on graduation night he finally noticed her and she gave him everything she had to offer, and then he threw it back in her face and left her humiliated. Ten years later Superbowl star Ty is in need of a makeover, his off the field activities have gotten him in trouble with the new owner and they want a image consultant to come in and do the job, when Ty realizes it is Julie he is on board. He has never forgotten her, and wants to see if there is still something there. I thought this was a great book, both Ty and Julie are their own worst enemies holding their shattered feelings in, which causes misunderstandings. Great book.